Category Archives: eggs

Malaysian Pancake – The Recipe

As requested, here’s the rather simple recipe to make Malaysian pancakes.

What you’d need is

  • 340g of plain wheat flour ( not exactly sure what other flour types can be used of course
  • 4 teaspoons of baking powder
  • 3 teaspoons of sugar
  • 2 eggs-beaten
  • 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  • 2 cups of water/H20
  • 1 cup of milk (Yum I love milk)
  • 2 teaspoons of corn oil

Pancake Inards or otherwise known as fillings :p

  • 3 teaspoon of roasted/grounded peanuts
  • 6 teaspoons of butter
  • 6 teaspoons of castor sugar ( this is to give it the sweet crunchiness with the grounded peanuts )
  • 3 teaspoons of cream-style corn

Batter preparation

Mix flour, sugar and salt into a bowl.
Make a well in the center.
Add in milk, egg, oil and water in the well.
Mix it all in together

Preparation Method

  • Lightly grease the pan with a knob of butter
  • Heat pan till you see a little wispy smoke being emitted.
  • Take a large spoonful of batter and spread evenly onto the greased pan.
  • When the batter is half cooked, sprinkle some groundnuts, sugar and add in a few teaspoons of corn over the surface.
  • Add in another knob of butter. Cover pan.
  • Cook for about 3-4 minutes. Remove from heat and fold into two.
  • Serve it piping hot.
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Dinner Fanfare 190KMs away!

….that took abot 2-2.5 hours of driving. I still cannot believe I drove that far for food Well, not that it’s any different from other places but I’d to attend a rather, festive-like dinner in commeration of my grandaunts 95th birthday. Boy, I’d love to be at her age :p

The restaurant that I’d to go to was in Ipoh, which would roughly acrue to about 190km or so from Kuala Lumpur.

I don’t have any form of addy, and neither do I recall the name of the restaurant but I did however, manage to make up for my short term memory by showing you food(s) that were on display and digested by our tummies.Yes, they were good and I don’t know how much everything would have amounted to.

First dish, started with a ‘pau’ that had red marzipan-ish letterings on it, Fertility. How fertile that is I don’t know as grandaunt’s childless.

This was promptly followed by a seafood fanfare of lobsters, crabs, lobster meats in salads etc. I don’t know what other things may have entailed in this fare but this was by far, my favourite.

Large scary looking lobbie 😀

And a huge roasted pig. Say cheese dahlings. I nearly puked as it was oily, imagine eating a whole chunk of lard.

And was quickly followed by shark fins soup. Yes, I know that PETA would probaby be pissed at me for this but it was all very much a part of the banquet. Oh, this soup was shark fins + crab roe. Erm, anyone for the roes?

Ooh my next favourite! Loads of lily buds, on little vegs I have no known name for and century eggs. *literally century eggs as they’re known for their rather putrid taste but aren’t exactly 100 year old eggs ;)* What could be as bad as a balut?

Fish. Looks very much dissected.

Mango pudding on some Japanese jello. The chinese word, if I’m not mistaken it means, Double Happiness/Prosperity? Will someone help me out here?

I could have taken more pics but seriously, I was grossed out by the amount of food/dishes that led to waste.

Eggs…….

I thought Angela didn’t like eggs unless they were hidden in pastry or cakes etc, but I was just informed that she actually didn’t mind some of the ways eggs are prepared. I, on the other hand, love eggs. They are so versatile and delicious cooked anyway. 😀

The Finished goods! - congee, chinese food, wandering gourmet

So I thought I’d share my favorite way to prepare a special and different type of egg. It’s called “Century Egg and Lean Pork Congee”. I made this the other day for my brunch (I over slept), so the pictures are my own. Century Eggs or 100 year old Egg, for the uninitiated, is usually a duck egg that has been preserved in a clay, salt, lime, ash and straw mix for a few weeks.

I don’t know the chemical affects of the process, but it turns the egg white into a brown jelly like consistency and the yolk turns a partially creamy, bluish green, almost like mold colour. The taste of this egg on its own is slightly tart and almost like blue cheese, so it is more of an acquired taste.

You can buy it form most Asian grocers now, as it is rather popular, and to make life easier they already washed the mud off the eggs. Contrary to popular beliefs (due to its name) it is not preserved for 100 years. I think it was one of those poetic names bestowed upon the humble preserved egg by our ancestors. An easy way to serve this is sliced into quarters and eaten with a slice of pickled ginger. Yummy! Or the more common way is to have it in a congee. Congee is a savory rice porridge eaten throughout East Asia for breakfast or as a light lunch. So here is my recipe for Pwei Tan Sow Yok Chok (Century Egg and Lean Pork Congee).

You start with your basic congee, which is made with just lots of water and a little bit of rice, boil th eheck out of it until it is to the consitency you like. I prefer mine thick, but if you find it too thick add more water. I think it is about 4 parts water to 1 part of rice. When we make a large pot of it we tend to use just half a cup of rice in a big pot filled up to the halfway point with water.

While that is cooking, slice up into tiny little shreds, some lean pork. I’m talking pork with preferably no fat on it. I like to boil my egg first, but I don’t think you have to. (I have a paranoid mother, I’ve picked up her habits. :S) cut up the egg into iddy biddy pieces, keeping in mind the taste is strong and its not cheap for an egg.

When the congee is mostly a soupy consistency, add the pork and season with salt and white pepper. Add chicken stock if you want, then add the egg pieces. Taste it and adjust to your tastes. Serve piping hot with a drop of sesame oil a sprinkling of finely chopped spring onions, and deep fried wonton pastry pieces if you want. Enjoy!